"Just the facts, Ma'am" - Sgt Joe Friday

Understanding
The Numbers

Studies

Smoking Bans
And Businesses

Odds and Ends

   

Smoking Ban Links


Nicotine Nannies claim smoking bans are good for business. But if that were the case, could this list exist, and could it be so huge? (Please note, this is only a small sample of articles available on the subject.)

This page uses blogging software to make it easier to search. Each post contains excerpts from the original article. Our comments are in italics. More detailed information is available here.

Bingo profits plummet following city smoking ban

 
Thursday, August 24th, 2006

Edmonton-area charities are feeling the squeeze after their bingo profits plummet by $6.8 million in the year following the city smoking ban.

Edmonton-area charities are feeling the squeeze after their bingo profits plummet by $6.8 million in the year following the city smoking ban.

“To have the bingos kind of crash and burn has been a real deterrent to our programs because it’s pretty hard to replace that funding,” said Lorraine Jex, president of the city’s northeast zone sports council.

During the first full year of the puffing ban – which kicked in July 1, 2005 – the nearly 600 charities that run bingos in the Edmonton area made $6.1 million, down from $12.9 million a year earlier, according to provincial figures obtained by the Sun. That represents a whopping 53% drop.

During the past year, bingo profits in the rest of Alberta – where smoking is generally still permitted – dropped only 1%.

Jex said her organization went from making $2,500 a night to pocketing as little as $200. The money is used to maintain sports facilities like baseball diamonds and to pay registration fees for kids whose families can’t afford to. The sports council runs bingos on behalf of minor hockey, baseball and softball teams in northeast Edmonton.
Jex said so far no kids have been turned away, but her group has been forced to go to local businesses with hat in hand.

“All of that money we don’t have just means it’s that much more difficult to fund some of these kids,” Jex said.

Terry Aikens, manager of the Kensington Bingo Centre, said that, prior to the smoking ban, a charitable group could make $4,000 an evening. “Now if they can make $1,000 they’re doing good,” she said, adding attendance has also dropped by about 50% at her hall — from 400 to 200 people a night.

She said it’s getting more difficult to convince the 73 charitable organizations that use the bingo hall to continue to do so.

“They’re not making enough money to make it worth their while.”

Overall, attendance at evening bingo dropped an average of 29% in Edmonton over the past year, according to Alberta Satellite Bingo, which broadcasts games live into halls across the province.

Coun. Mike Nickel said the numbers prove the smoking ban is having economic consequences.

“Some people were saying this wasn’t going to affect anyone’s business,” he said. “Well, that’s not the case.

“People who are paying for this in the end, taking the health issue aside, have been the charities.”

But Shane Bergdahl, president of the Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues, said bingos had been losing their popularity, even before the indoor puffing ban.
“Revenue had been dropping off for years,” he said.

Coun. Michael Phair said this indicates it’s time for the province to consider new ways to fund charitable groups.

(Ah, the compassion of the nicotine nannies. Isn’t it inspiring?

Source: Edmonton Sun. Link

Comments are closed.

 

© 2000 - 2011 Dave Hitt

Permission is granted to use this information, in whole or in part, however you like.
Attribution and Links are appreciated but not required.

WordPress Theme Designed By (dasmetech developers, dasmetech@gmail.com)

Home | Contact Us


Like this? Find more at DaveHitt.Com