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Nicotine Nannies claim smoking bans are good for business. But if that were the case, could this list exist, and could it be so huge? (Please note, this is only a small sample of articles available on the subject.)

This page uses blogging software to make it easier to search. Each post contains excerpts from the original article. Our comments are in italics. More detailed information is available here.

Archive for November, 2008

Dutch cafe owners rally against smoking ban

 
Sunday, November 30th, 2008

THE HAGUE (AFP) — Dutch cafe owners on Saturday took to the streets of The Hague in protest at a smoking ban they say has seen business drop by up to a third.

The cafe owners want the ban, which came into force on July 1, scrapped arguing they have neither the space nor the money to build specially-ventilated smoking areas.

Source: AFP. Link

Pub campaigners bid to alter smoking ban

 
Monday, November 24th, 2008

CAMPAIGNERS fighting for the future of the Great British pub are today attempting to alter the controversial smoking ban.

Even the government accepts the legislation has had a huge impact on trade and is allowing bars to claim business rate reductions.

The ban is often cited as one of the prime factors killing pubs – and now a campaign has been launched in Suffolk to try to amend the law.

Jim Adams is behind the bid and is urging regulars at pubs all over the country to sign a petition.

“The smoking ban should be replaced with a rule that would require all public houses to have a room set aside for smokers instead of the really stupid overall ban,” said Mr Adams, who runs Jim and Donna’s Barbers in Hamilton Road, Felixstowe.

The ban is killing the pub trade and removing from the English way of life one of the most sought after features for tourists coming here. There is no justifiable reason to stop those who wish to smoke from so doing.

“If there is another part of the pub which is a smoking area then the folk who wish to smoke may so do, and those who want a smoke-free area may have the rest of the establishment – including the food area – to themselves.”

The Evening Star is highlighting the loss of pubs in the area – more than 100 have closed in living memory – and the threat many are now facing to their future.

Kate Nicholls, head of communications at the Association of Licensed Multiple Retailers (ALMR), which represents pubs and bars, said: “Last summer’s bad weather and the smoking ban were to blame for a number of closures.

“People are not going to want to stand outside and smoke when the weather is unpleasant and with extremely cheap supermarket drink deals available. It just gives people a reason to stay home.”

Source: Evening Star.  Link

Smoking Bans Are Major Contributor to Casino Revenue Losses

 
Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

Minnesota smoking bans for instance were the catalyst for closing an unprecedented 200+ bars, restaurants, and bingo halls.

Nationwide and around the world the loss of businesses and jobs after smoking bans are implemented is staggering. Even though air quality testing by organizations like the American Cancer Society, Johns Hopkins, a Minnesota Environmental Health Department, British Medical Journal published contributors prove that secondhand smoke levels are 15 – 25,000 times SAFER than OSHA permissible exposure limits (PEL).

Meanwhile Nicoderm manufacturer Johnson & Johnson Company, whose private foundation RWJF funds the smoking ban movement, saw 40% 1st quarter 2008 revenue growth over their previous year.

Currently, smoking cessation product sales just in the U.S. accounts for $500 million, but thanks to rent seeking smoking ban legislation; industry insiders expect those sales to climb to $4.6 billion annually by 2016.

Source: Casino Gambeling Web.  Link.

Owner: Smoke Ban Forced Me To Close My Bar

 
Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

JOHNSTON, Iowa — After a decade in business, the Nest Bar and Grill in Johnston is empty.

The owner, Rich Marx, said the smoking ban drove him out of business.

“We just celebrated our 10 year anniversary last Wednesday and then shut the doors three days later,” Marx said.

“Since the smoking ban went into effect July 1, we’ve lost just over 40 percent of our business,” he said.

Source: KCCI.  Link.

Gulfport smoking ban has restaurant owner steaming

 
Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) – Eight months ago, Ricky Dombrowski supported Gulfport’s smoking ban. But after watching almost 30% of his profits go up in smoke, he’s had a change of heart. Dombrowski is now pushing for a modification to the smoking ban, before it snuffs out his restaurant.

Dombrowski has received two calls from Gulfport police, warning him that smoking inside Skeeters is illegal. But if he obeys the law, he says his Gulfport business could close.

In the first three months after smoking was banned, his restaurant revenues dropped more than 30%. So, in August, he started to look the other way when people wanted to smoke. By October, he put out ashtrays.

Source: WLOX-TV.  Link.

Dutch bar owners defiant over smoking ban

 
Wednesday, November 19th, 2008

At first, pubs and smokers seemed to be complying to the new smoke-free regime. But as bar owners saw their revenue plummet, the ashtrays have been put back on the table.

The organization representing hotels, restaurants and cafés, KHN, thinks the Health Minister is leaving small cafés out in the cold. KHN says bar owners should enforce the ban, but argues for compensation for small pubs faced with substantially fewer customers as a result. The organization predicts 1500 to 3000 establishments will go out of business as a result of the ban. KHN managing director Lodewijk van der Grinten says.

Meanwhile the bar owners who are resisting the smoking ban are in defiant mood. A spokesperson for a pressure group representing 1400 bar owners in 32 towns says, “We would rather go under with the ashtrays on the bar, than allow ourselves be led to the slaughter.”

Source: Radio Nederland.  Link

Smoking ban puts 300 pubs in tax bind

 
Monday, November 17th, 2008

THREE hundred NSW hotels have applied to defer payment of $18.6 million tax on gambling machine revenue, which has plummeted since an indoor smoking ban was introduced last year.

A hardship scheme that was available only to registered clubs suffering more than a 15 per cent downturn in poker machine revenue was extended to pubs in September.

The eligible hotels have experienced an average 24.5 per cent decline in gambling machine revenue in the 12 months to September, compared with the 12 months before the smoking ban came into force. The average drop across the state’s 2084 hotels was 12.58 per cent.

Source: The Sydney Morning Herald.  Link

Smoking ban lifted at struggling casinos

 
Sunday, November 16th, 2008

The City Council passed a total smoking ban in April but the financial meltdown led to a steep decline in takings at the casinos.

Source: Telegraph.  Link

Smoking ban has cleared the air, but businesses suffer

 
Thursday, November 13th, 2008

Carpenter works part time at the Legion. He said the smoking ban has driven away business. Pull tab receipts are down and people who used to be regular customers don’t come around as often and they don’t stay as long. Carpenter said veterans especially, should have a right to smoke in their own club.

“They’ve served their country, and a lot of them are older veterans,” Carpenter said. “They’re not going to stand outside in 35 below zero weather and smoke. I mean, they’ll sit at home and smoke.”

The Bemidji American Legion has been smoke free longer than most bars in the state. That’s because Beltrami County passed a smoking ban ordinance a full two years before the state did. Club manager Bill Rice said the ban is largely to blame for cutting the club’s business in half.

“We were doing two and a half million in business in gross sales a year,” Rice said. “We’re down to a little over a million this year.”

Rice has had to cut three jobs at the Legion since the smoking ban took effect.

Minnesota Licensed Beverage Association interim director Tony Chesak said it’s clear to him the ban is causing bars across the state to fail.

I’d say, realistically, 200 to 300 licensed establishments, at least, have closed,” Chesak said. “I would think that would be a conservative number.”

Membership in the association dropped about 25 percent this year. Chesak said the promise of non-smokers frequenting bars more often because of the smoke free law hasn’t panned out.

“All the anti-smoking folks had said, you know, you get smoking out of your facilities and we’ll come in droves,” said Chesak. “Well, those droves didn’t come out.” {They never do.}

A poll conducted in September shows Minnesotans support the statewide smoke-free law by an overwhelming 77 percent. Gordon said national studies have found that smoking bans don’t hurt businesses in states that have bans in place. {That’s only true of studies conducted by nicotine nannies or the governments that passed the law. The few studies funded by tavern associations show the real, devastating effects.}

Source: Minnesota Public Radio. Link.

Smoking ban has cleared the air, but businesses suffer

 
Thursday, November 13th, 2008

“It’s miserable,” Carpenter said.

Carpenter works part time at the Legion. He said the smoking ban has driven away business. Pull tab receipts are down and people who used to be regular customers don’t come around as often and they don’t stay as long. Carpenter said veterans especially, should have a right to smoke in their own club.

“They’ve served their country, and a lot of them are older veterans,” Carpenter said. “They’re not going to stand outside in 35 below zero weather and smoke. I mean, they’ll sit at home and smoke.”

The Bemidji American Legion has been smoke free longer than most bars in the state. That’s because Beltrami County passed a smoking ban ordinance a full two years before the state did. Club manager Bill Rice said the ban is largely to blame for cutting the club’s business in half.

“We were doing two and a half million in business in gross sales a year,” Rice said. “We’re down to a little over a million this year.”

Rice has had to cut three jobs at the Legion since the smoking ban took effect.

There’s no clear data yet to fully assess the economic impact of the smoking ban. Over the past year, Minnesota lost about 1,000 jobs in bars and restaurants. That’s significantly more lost jobs than the national average. But state employment analysts say it’s not clear whether the smoking ban was a factor.

Minnesota Licensed Beverage Association interim director Tony Chesak said it’s clear to him the ban is causing bars across the state to fail.

“I’d say, realistically, 200 to 300 licensed establishments, at least, have closed,” Chesak said. “I would think that would be a conservative number.”

Membership in the association dropped about 25 percent this year. Chesak said the promise of non-smokers frequenting bars more often because of the smoke free law hasn’t panned out.

“All the anti-smoking folks had said, you know, you get smoking out of your facilities and we’ll come in droves,” said Chesak. “Well, those droves didn’t come out.”  {They never do.}

Source: Minnesota Public Radio.  Link

Smoking ban may reduce pub rates by thousands

 
Sunday, November 9th, 2008

Pubs across the country may be overpaying rates by more than £2,000 a year because the Government failed to correctly assess the impact of the smoking ban.

Shadow communities secretary Eric Pickles said that a £5,000 reduction in the rateable value of their business could save publicans £2,200 a year, at a time when the British Beer and Pub Association estimates that pubs are closing at the rate of 27 a week.

Source:  Telegraph UK  Link

62 lose jobs as the Wild Horse Casino closes down

 
Friday, November 7th, 2008

The worst year in history for Colorado casinos claimed its first victim Friday, when the Wild Horse Casino in Cripple Creek closed its doors, putting 62 employees out of work.

Revenues for casinos in Cripple Creek, along with Colorado’s other gaming towns, have fallen every month this year. In September, Cripple Creek gaming revenues fell 10.3 percent to $12.8 million compared to the same month in 2007, according to the state Division of Gaming. Statewide, gaming revenue was off 18.7 percent in September and 11.4 percent for the year to date.

Source: Hotel Online. Link.

Pubs to go as Punch reports loss

 
Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

Pubs group Punch Taverns has reported an annual loss as the consumer slowdown and smoking ban hit its business.

The pub group said it made a pre-tax loss of £80.2m in the year to August 23, down sharply from a profit of £304.7m a year ago.

To strengthen its business, Punch wants to sell about 500 less profitable pubs.

The group’s share price has fallen 80% over the past year as a result of concerns about the firm’s financial position.

This was “brought about by the change in the consumer market following the first full-year of the smoking ban” and “a weakened consumer environment,” Punch said.

Source: BBC News.  Link

Mental illness, the law and rudeness

 
Monday, November 3rd, 2008

England’s smoking ban applies to psychiatric hospitals.  The smoking rooms they used to have for patients are now illegal, so patients are lighting up other places, and causing fires. 

Psychiatric units are experiencing major problems with implementation of the NHS smoking ban. Although this was implemented in other parts of the NHS last year, there was a delay until July 1 this year for psychiatric units in recognition that they would face specific difficulties.

Despite the additional time to prepare, a number of unforeseen consequences of the ban have occurred. Most alarmingly, the frequency of “small” fires on psychiatric units has increased sharply. At the mental health trust where I work, the frequency of fires has quadrupled since the start of the ban, from about one fire every two months to two fires a month. At the same time the sensitivity of smoke detectors on psychiatric wards at our trust has been reduced in an attempt to reduce the number of “false alarms” triggered by smoking in enclosed areas and unnecessary calls to the fire brigade.

The increase in the number of fires is thought to be the result of patients no longer being supervised smoking in a “smoking room” and instead resorting to smoking in their bedrooms and the toilets. Whereas previously patients’ cigarettes would either be lit by staff or from a wall-mounted lighter, there is now widespread possession of lighters and matches by patients, and patients are easily able to circumvent body searches.

On October 15, a fire at Camlet Lodge secure psychiatric unit in north London caused an estimated £60m of damage and the evacuation of 60 patients to another facility; fortunately, no one was injured. Camlet Lodge is a modern purpose-built unit meeting current fire standards. Unfortunately, many psychiatric units are still housed in old Victorian buildings.

Staff in the frontline of implementing the smoking ban are at a loss what to do. Attempts to raise this issue with hospital managers at my trust have not produced any practical solution, as managers feel their hands are tied by the Health Act 2006. Surely it was not parliament’s intention when they passed the smoking ban to cause risk to life and limb. Public debate on this issue is urgently required before there is a significant loss of life in a fire at an NHS psychiatric hospital.

Source: The Guardian.  Link

 

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