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Geek Test

If you get this joke in three seconds or less you are a Geek.

If you get this joke in three seconds or less you are an Über Geek.

If you looked at the “Ü” character and thought “I know the alt/numpad combination to generate that without looking up an ASCII chart” you are a Super Über Geek.

We’ll leave it up to you to decide if your ranking is a good thing or a bad thing.

For the record, I got the first one right away, because I’ve worked for software houses and know that cliché by heart.  I got the second one quickly too,  but had to Google an ASCII chart to find the key combination for the “Ü”.  (It’s alt/154.)

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3 Comment(s)

  1. I got the first two right away, but didn’t know the third off the top of my head. Though I do know the LaTeX code would be \”{U}, so does that count?

    John | Jun 8, 2010 | Reply

  2. Did not get the first one, but my native language isn’t English. Did get the second one. On a Mac, the Ümlaut is alt-u. Ümlaut is a German word.
    On the iPad, you just hold the u key.

    Eur van Andel | Jun 9, 2010 | Reply

  3. Probably not the best idea to hard code the umlauted U, since there’s not guarantee that every system will use the same character map. But HTML will generate the character if you use ‘Ü’.

    BTW, I was worried, because I got the second one instantly, but not the first one for a couple of minutes.

    Stephen Dawson | Jun 14, 2010 | Reply

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